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Looking to the Future: JoPAN Update

      The JoPAN Co-Editors and Editorial Advisory Board have been working hard to determine next steps and strategically plan for the future. To close out this year, 2022, I thought it would be a good time to report some JoPAN information and future plans.

      JoPAN Report

      The submissions to JoPAN have doubled since 2018—keeping the editors moving fast—but a nice problem to have. International submissions are a big part of that increase with an exponential increase in submissions from other countries. The top 3 countries by far with submissions and acceptances are the US, Turkey, and China. Other countries that have also submitted articles in the past year include Iran, Sweden, Germany, Spain, Greece, and others. The speed at which an article moves from first decision (accept) to final publication has decreased in the past 4 years. However, one issue we have had the past couple of years is the number of publications under review and the difficulty finding enough reviewers at times. The problem with finding reviewers was a noticeable difficulty during the first couple of years of Covid because healthcare workers were obviously so busy. It is beginning to resolve, but with the influx of submissions is still a challenge at times. Some good news is that JoPAN's 2021 impact factor (IF) has increased to 1.295, which is a good IF for a nursing specialty journal. See Box 1.
      Impact Factor
      What is an impact factor?
      Impact factor is a measure of the number of times an average paper in a journal is cited, during a year.
      How is an impact factor calculated?
      The impact factor calculation is based on a two-year period and involves dividing the number of times articles were cited by the number of articles that are citable.
      UIC Library. Measuring Your Impact: Impact Factor, Citation Analysis, and other Metrics: Journal Impact Factor (IF). Accessed October 5, 2022. Available at: https://researchguides.uic.edu/if/impact
      I thought you might be interested in some of the most cited and downloaded articles and those that have received social media attention as of June 2022. The most cited article so far this year is “Effect of Preoperative Education on Postoperative Outcomes Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.”
      • Ramesh C.
      • Nayak B.S.
      • Pai V.B.
      • et al.
      Effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
      The most cited article since 2010 is “Noise in the Operating Room–What Do We Know? A Review of the Literature.”
      • Hasfeldt D.
      • Laerkner E.
      • Birkelund R.
      Noise in the operating room–what do we know? A review of the literature.
      The most downloaded article so far this year is “Education, Competence, and Role of the Nurse Working in the PACU: An International Survey.”
      • Dahlberg K.
      • Brady J.M.
      • Jaensson M.
      • Nilsson U.
      Odom-Forren. Education, competence, and role of the nurse working in the PACU: an international survey.
      The most downloaded article by far since 2010 is “Educating Patients: Understanding Barriers, Learning Styles, and Teaching Techniques.”
      • Beagley L.
      Educating patients: understanding barriers, learning styles, and teaching techniques.
      The top two articles by social attention over a lifetime were “Enough is Enough!”,
      • Hooper VD.
      Enough is enough.
      an editorial by co-editor Vallire Hooper and “Global Climate Change and Human Health”
      • Brady J.
      Global climate change and human health.
      by columnist, Joni Brady. The most downloads of our articles are via Science Direct, followed by the JoPAN website and Clinical Key.

      JoPAN Reader Survey

      I also thought you might be interested in some highlights from the reader survey that ran from March 3, 2022 to April 11, 2022. We had 988 responses, an 8% return rate, which is typical for this type of survey. More than half of respondents read JoPAN monthly or more often. They believe that JoPAN as the official journal of ASPAN provides useful information for professionals, practitioners and clinical practice, and keeps readers up-to-date with the latest advances. The print issue is largely the main starting point for JoPAN articles as opposed to online. Most readers consider the quality of the articles published in JOPAN as “Top of the field.” Twenty percent of JoPAN readers use the website frequently. When asked what was missing from JoPAN, common themes reported by the readers were: needmore on bedside nursing, more continuing education articles, a clinical or best practice FAQ section on research articles, and translation to practice for small communities. Sample suggestions to improve JoPAN were: more outreach and assistance to nurses who would like to publish practice ideas, but don't have the knowledge or resources at their institution and again, more continuing education articles.
      The editors and editorial board are in continuous discussions to move forward to meet the needs of the readers.

      Continuing Education (CE)

      The challenge with continuing education articles is that they are not as frequently submitted to JoPAN. We have tried to change most basic clinical articles into CE articles, but clinical articles are our least submitted articles as well. The plan is to begin to offer contact hours for some of the research and best practice articles to expand the opportunity for readers to access continuing education.

      Clinical Implications of Research or Best Practice

      We are in the process of developing a clinical implications box for all research and best practice articles to assist in translating the research or best practice to bedside. You can watch for that transition in the future.

      Translation to Practice for Smaller Hospitals

      We are hoping that our Evidence to Practice column will assist in ways to translate research to practice even in smaller hospitals. We are in discussions now how to better serve those facilities that are rural or smaller. We are also considering the addition of a column that would focus on translating research to practice in these settings.

      Assistance to Publish

      We are also discussing ways to assist those who are interested in publishing, but do not have the resources or knowledge. We have had workshops at the national conference, but obviously not everyone is able to attend. One plan is to work on shorter workshops that would be offered via the web. We believe that assistance in publishing is a way to increase clinical submissions.

      Social Media

      By far, the largest social media platform used by respondents is Facebook (FB) followed by Instagram. Only 9% of respondents use Twitter. Interestingly, there is a JoPAN presence on Twitter which most respondents were unaware (@JOPANJournal). We are in discussions to determine how to best push JoPAN content on ASPAN's FB, Instagram and Twitter. We are very open to reader ideas.

      Reader Engagement

      Some readers commented on the difficulty of reading research articles. In an effort to engage readers, we have added the opportunity for authors to add a graphical abstract to a research article. We have not had one submitted yet, but hopefully in the future some of the research articles will have an infographic abstract to appeal to the reader. Costs prevent us from adding color figures to the printed copy of the journal. But know that you can always access the articles you are interested in from the JoPAN website (www.jopan.org) and the figures will be in color.
      We appreciate all of our readers and especially appreciate the feedback of those who took the time to answer the survey. Vallire and I are always open to feedback from our readers. For ASPAN members, this is your journal.
      Lastly, for this December editorial, have a wonderful Holiday Season—Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanza, and Happy New Year. We will see you on the other side of 2022.

      References

        • Ramesh C.
        • Nayak B.S.
        • Pai V.B.
        • et al.
        Effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2017; 32: 518-529
        • Hasfeldt D.
        • Laerkner E.
        • Birkelund R.
        Noise in the operating room–what do we know? A review of the literature.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2010; 25: 380-386
        • Dahlberg K.
        • Brady J.M.
        • Jaensson M.
        • Nilsson U.
        Odom-Forren. Education, competence, and role of the nurse working in the PACU: an international survey.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2021; 36: 224-231
        • Beagley L.
        Educating patients: understanding barriers, learning styles, and teaching techniques.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2011; 26: 331-337
        • Hooper VD.
        Enough is enough.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2021; 36: 443-444
        • Brady J.
        Global climate change and human health.
        J Perianesth Nurs. 2020; 35: 89-90